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Nature Activities

Who's been eating the marigolds?

Spring time is good for cleaning up the bird feeders and we were considering refilling them less frequently, as the birds and squirrels can find super delicious food during spring and summer time!

Lately we have been noticing piles of marigold petals across the yard and we soon found our little suspects :)


















Hmm..the leaves smell good too...!

















 The tender seeds taste better!

















Hey! Did someone say 'click'....

















Now lemme eat..crunch crunch...I got my share...chomp chomp..!



Plastic bottle planters

Firstly wash the bottles clean. Then cut out two or four openings on the top portion of bottles(depending upon the size). Punch about three drain holes underneath. Fill the soil just about an inch below the cut openings. Use a strong string to hang them up.




We chose a few garden hardy plants to try out and the results were good. A half a cup of water will do if watered  regularly.



Children love the Wandering Jew for its lovely colour and of course the pretty Purslane. We'll surely post pictures of these plants in bloom.


Upside down tomato plant

We tried growing a tomato plant upside down in a plastic bottle and it worked! We came across this wonderful  idea by DebH57 quiet some time ago. Now our tomato plant has started flowering and the children watch it almost everyday!






Growing seedlings

We planted some calendula seeds in a plastic bottle cut in the half and holes drilled on the cap underneath.





Reuse small plastic bottles as bird or squirrel feeders

We found that it is a good idea to use a small plastic bottle as a bird feeder and place it in a flower pot with a plant growing in it, especially on a rainy day. And look who was the first one to catch a tasty bite! We got these pictures the next day after the rain as we were too busy watching the scuffle between the squirrels, bulbuls and the jungle bablers :)





A Butterfly in our classroom 

 We enjoyed watching various stages of the Common Jay butterfly. We captured some precious moments as the newly emerged butterfly fluttered around and flew into our yard.






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